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Latine Heritage Month Mini Collection: About

About

Latine Heritage Collection with images of Latin American flowers

Join us in celebrating National Latine Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 by exploring our virtual collection of books and podcasts, as well as a playlist of music curated by La Voz Latina at Trinity College. 

Latine Heritage Month began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week but was later expanded to a full month of celebration in 1988 under Public Law 100-402. September 15th was selected as the starting date because it marks the anniversary of independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.

Diversity, equity, and inclusion are central to our mission, so we have elected to use the term Latine (pronounced latin-eh) over Latinx because, as Terry Blas points out in “You Say Latinx,” it is both gender-inclusive and pronounceable in Spanish.

The materials in this collection spotlight the histories, cultures, and achievements of Latine communities. It includes books from the Trinity College, Wesleyan, and Connecticut College Libraries. Books can be borrowed from any of the three libraries.

Image Credit: Gisselle Hernández   

 

Guide Creators:                          

                           Gisselle Hernández          Cait Kennedy             Jeffrey Liszka        Yoli Bergstrom-Lynch       Dr. Amanda Guzman

Trinity College Library Books

Fiction

Short Stories & Anthologies

Poetry & Plays

Afro-Latine

LGBTQ2S+ Voices

Graphic Novels

Biographies; Memoirs, & Oral Histories

History & Social Sciences

Wesleyan & Connecticut College Collections

Fiction

Short Stories & Anthologies

Afro-Latine

LGBTQ2S+ Voices

Poetry & Plays

Graphic Novels

Biographies & Memoirs and Oral Histories

History & Social Sciences

Music

La Voz Latina Spotify Playlist

Podcasts

Talks

Invited Lectures & Ted Talks


Smithsonian American Art Museum curatorial assistant, Claudia Zapata discussed the process of curation and their exhibition work on, ¡Printing the Revolution: the Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics, 1965 to Now with E. Carmen Ramos, Chief Curatorial and Conservation Officer at the National Gallery of Art. This presentation was hosted as part of the fall 2021 course, Decentering and Re-centering History: Anthropology of Museums, taught by Professor Amanda Guzmán.

Digital Exhibits

Featured Digital Exhibits

Virtual tour for ¡Printing the Revolution! The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics 1965 to Now (Smithsonian)

"Explore ¡Printing the Revolution! The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics,1965 to Now from anywhere in this virtual experience. Immerse yourself in bold and innovative graphic art and learn about the history and traditions of the Chicano movement while virtually moving through SAAM's galleries."

Shareable Graphics

"Shareable graphics are digital images disseminated across the internet and social media platforms. Artists distribute these works to aid in solidarity efforts, political protest, and social advocacy. Some shareable graphics are meant to continue their circulation in physical form, with artists providing a higher quality image for people to download and print. Others primarily exist in online forms geared toward inciting dialogue and creating a wider networked distribution. At no cost to audiences, shareable graphics function as did early protest posters in efforts to gain momentum for social causes and assert the presence of marginalized groups. However, in this digital space, online dialogue emerges between users and graphics that offers unprecedented exposure, user interactivity, and interpretation."

Exploring the Maya World

"A journey into the past with ancient art and digital technology."

El Olmedo -- Museo Dolores Olmedo

Located in Xochimilco, at Mexico City's southern extreme, the Dolores Olmedo Museum, in collaboration with Google Arts and Culture, provides online exhibits of the works of Frida Kahlo and Diego Riverra

Latinx Objects (National Museum of African American History and Culture)

"The Latinx-related objects and archival collections at the National Museum of African American History and Culture traverse racial identifications and national boundaries. This online portal is a guide to exploring the diversity of our Latinx-related holdings."

 ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues

"¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues takes audiences on a journey into the heart of American baseball to understand how generations of Latinas/os have helped make the game what it is today. Their inspirational stories gesture to larger themes in American history that connect us all, on and off the diamond."

Google Arts & Culture: Latino Culture in the U.S.

"Launched in 2017 in partnership with museums and organizations across the U.S., the Google Arts & Culture online collection is organized into the categories of film, sports, dance, music, tradition, and style. The site also highlights specific aspects of the Hispanic and Latinx experience, such as an online exhibit of queer Latinx culture and an oral history project on Hispanic and Latinx life during World War II."

MOLAA En Casa

"The MOLAA is the only U.S. museum fully dedicated to modern and contemporary Latin American and Latinx art. Physically located in Long Beach, California, the museum makes it easy to navigate its online materials via the MOLAA En Casa web page. Users can view online exhibits and pieces from the museum’s permanent collection, take video tours, and more."